Hurry Up and Wait!

Long-term Results in an Instantaneous World

Can you believe how impatient we’ve become? I just made myself a cup of hot chocolate, with miniature marshmallows, of course. No, I didn’t heat the milk in a saucepan over the stove. I stuck it in the microwave.

Less than two minutes later I’m thinking, What’s taking it so long to get hot?

Not too many years ago I would have needed a block of chocolate to shave off; melted the chocolate over a low heat; and, then gently added the milk while stirring continuously for several minutes.

Young people growing up today have no concept of life without a microwave; phones that were only in one room and didn’t leave the house; long-distance and international calls that went over cables, not the Internet, and cost a fortune; or, banking that had to be done only in person. Times have changed!

And yet, we can become so invested in instantaneous gratification that we forget some things still take time. (Take it from a gardener – I know!) Are there areas of your life that are getting you anxious because you’re not seeing the results you want? Here’s what Robert Louis Stevenson wrote about that:

Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant.

One trick that we can all employ is to enjoy the moment, as well as making sure what we are doing in that moment is what we want to do. If we are working in a place that we hate; if we are living in a home we can stand; or, if we are in a relationship that’s over-stayed its welcome, then it’s hard to enjoy the moment.

To create a life worth living we must focus on what we want, not what we don’t want. We do this by planting seeds now that will grow into the results we want to reap. Consider your thoughts right now. Are they in line with want you want?

If so, plant those seeds, nurture them, and enjoy the harvest when it arrives. If not, it may be time to change your thinking to change your life – both for now and the future!

In Spirit, Truth and Playfulness,
Terry

Copyright © 2018 Terry Drew Karanen. All rights reserved.
This message may be re-printed, copied and/or forwarded without permission, as long as the content is not altered in any way and credit is given to the author.