Strength and Empowerment Through Failure

Have you failed at anything? That’s an interesting question. If you’re like the majority of people who get asked that you’re already feeling some kind of emotional reaction.

Guilt, shame, anger, disappointment and denial are just five of the most popular you’ll encounter. The denial response is often found among New Agers and even some New Thought students who believe failure is impossible; or worse, unthinkable!

But here’s the kicker with ignoring or explaining away failure:

We miss the gift in failing.

By ignoring the fact that something didn’t work out the way we planned we gloss over the problems that most need our attention. Our ego will rise up through a dramatic entrance to any situation that even mildly alludes to us being wrong, incapable or inadequate. Guess what? We can be all of these things at times no matter who we are.

Ever watch a toddler learning to walk? She tries. She fails. She tries again. She falls down, probably giggling. Eventually, after many unsuccessful attempts, she stands on her own power and takes her first tentative step. That shows strength and character. Her ego hasn’t developed enough yet to be judge and jury for every minor or major foible she will encounter in growing up.

It’s not solely from the disappointment alone that we learn from our failures. It’s from recognizing what didn’t work and knowing that we have within us the power to do better next time. No matter how badly we screw up we have the assurance that we did the very best we could with the information available to us at the time.

When we have improved information, perhaps from failing at a task or relationship, we are better prepared to make more informed decisions in the future. Knowing that it was our decisions that created the situation with which we are now dealing assures us that we are empowered to change our thinking and enjoy results more to our liking.

And, even if the outcomes we come across appear to have been creating by others, we still have the choice to be at the effect of those situations, or draw upon the power within us to change our experience.

More than one person has said that if we aren’t failing from time-to-time then we’re probably doing very little and taking few chances. Step out now and move forward. If you’d like to be further encouraged by the successes of others who have dealt with failure, click here for a link to a truly inspiring webpage from the University of Kentucky.

In Spirit, Truth and Playfulness,
Terry

Copyright © 2017 Terry Drew Karanen. All rights reserved.
This message may be re-printed, copied and/or forwarded without permission, as long as the content is not altered in any way and credit is given to the author.

Do You Find it Difficult to Make Decisions?

Do You Need to Have it Your Way?

Do you find yourself faced with too many choices? It’s definitely a “first world” problem. People in third world countries search for clean water on a daily basis. Meanwhile, we’re stumped at our grocery store trying to decide which of the 20 different types flavoring we want in our bottled water.

A great thing about realizing we are empowered in life is the power to choose. The downside of that is that we may be confused about what to choose. We know we can manifest that which we desire; but exactly what it is that we want?

There is a rule of thumb when focusing on a goal or using affirmative prayer:  Be specific. Yet part of the joy in seeing our desires come into our life is watching how those things occur.

Being specific in our desires doesn’t mean we have to control the process. We can continue to be precise and detailed, but then turn it over to universal intelligence for the work necessary and the guidance needed. We don’t have to design detailed ways for things to happen. If fact, putting too many parameters on the way we expect our desires to come about can slow down or even stop the process.

If we truly believe in a power greater than us that we can use, then we would do well to balance our pragmatic desires with some good, old-fashioned trust. There are numerous examples in my own life and the life of others that I can think of where the outcome came about through completely unexpected means.

It’s not that the outcome was unexpected – there’s not much point in praying about something if we don’t expect it to happen! Rather it was the way in which it happened. By trusting in the process we open ourselves up to personal fulfillment as well as unique and amazing ways to be supported.

In Spirit, Truth and Playfulness,
Terry

Copyright © 2017 Terry Drew Karanen. All rights reserved.
This message may be re-printed, copied and/or forwarded without permission, as long as the content is not altered in any way and credit is given to the author.

Here’s Why Multitasking Sucks

Why being bad at multitasking may be a very good thing

Are you good at multitasking? If you say, “Yes!” you’re not alone. I’ve often said I’m very good at it. Many of my friends tell me they are, too, and they do so with a great deal of pride.

This blog is about why we’re dead wrong.

lot's to do

It’s also about why being bad at multitasking may be a very, good thing.

I completely understand multitasking. When my husband once told a colleague what I do for a living (full-time job, run my own business, head up a non-profit foundation, and volunteer extensively), his friend remarked, “Oh, so you’re telling me he really hasn’t figured out what he wants to be when he grows up.”

Ouch!

One of my heroes, Marie Forleo (marieforleo.com) describes herself as a “multi-passioned entrepreneur.” I can relate. Like me, Forleo has followed a number of passions and paths to get to the level of success she enjoys today. The trick, however, is that when we multi-passioned entrepreneurs are working on one of our areas of interest we are working ONLY in that area.

That’s the key to being involved in many activities and interests:  We must be focused on only one thing at a time. We must practice mindfulness.

Forleo explains that the act of multitasking is a conflict between having a single versus a split/multiple-focus. “A split- or multiple-focus approach will slow things down – it’s obvious, but we don’t always admit it!” she teaches.

Being a consummate multitasker for years I immediately objected when I heard her say this in an interview. But, given that she has a proven track record in success I decided to try it out for myself.

For about a week I refused to attempt doing two-, three- or more things at once. To help with this, each night before bed I created a list of accomplishments for the next day, categorizing them by level of importance.

The next day I followed the list to the letter. Plugging in space for unforeseen events or circumstances helps with this. I checked and responded to email and social media once in the morning and once in the afternoon (unless a list-related action required posting). I took time to make food for myself and/or my family; no reading, use of mobile devices or TV watching during eating. I even stopped making or taking phone calls while driving, even though I have a hands-free Bluetooth system in my car.

Boy did all that slow me down! But here’s the kicker:

I got more done.

My lifelong work has been to teach others how to have a life worth living through the use of vision and mission statements. There are many points to my method in doing that, but the two most important are focus and intention. Letting go of multitasking – which I’ve also called “doing many things poorly and getting little accomplished” – allows me to re-focus my intention.

The results over the past few months have been stunning. I’m happier, more content, definitely more productive, and my blood pressure is lower.

If you’re used to multitasking and feel you’re only successful if you’re exhausted at the end of the day from completing a list, give the information in this blog some thought. What are you willing to let go of so the project or direction you want to see manifest can get there more rapidly?

Hop on over to my “Making Sense of Life” blog to leave a comment! That link is:

http://blog.terrydrewkaranen.com

In Spirit, Truth and Playfulness,
Terry

Copyright © 2017 Terry Drew Karanen. All rights reserved.
This message may be re-printed, copied and/or forwarded without permission, as long as the content is not altered in any way and credit is given to the author.

Stop Trying To Be Yourself

Are you still trying to find your “purpose?” The problem is not finding it. The real challenge is what to do after you figure it out!

I starting teaching a workshop over twenty years ago called, “Discovering Your Bliss.” I was in my Joseph Campbell period, a ministerial student and wild about realizing in my own life what a difference having a vision and mission in life can make.

That afternoon seminar morphed itself into a manual and eventually my most recent book. I still strongly believe that having a vision and mission gives us a firm foundation for happiness and, therefore, success.

But it’s not enough.

As I’m beginning to find out in my own life, it may not even be necessary for everyone. Vision and mission statements are tools; that’s all they are. They aren’t the end-all to all end-alls. What we really need to be happy and succeed in life is already within us.

What’s that you ask? I’m so glad you did!21-blog

We must stop trying to be who we are and start being who we are.

Thanks, a lot, Terry. Fine. What’s THAT supposed to mean, oh great guru of knowledge and wisdom?

(In spite of that sarcasm there, I will respond!)

It means we frequently try too hard to:

  • Be something we’re not;
  • Always strive to please others;
  • Not pleasing ourselves;
  • Sanitize our approach;
  • Worry that we won’t appeal to everyone – NEW FLASH! WE WON’T!
  • Compare our happiness and satisfaction to others;
  • Base our worth on the number of people following our social media accounts; or,
  • Are terrified we’re “not ready.”

Well, pumpkin’ we’re NOT ready for that next big leap to magnificence. Of course we’re not “ready!” If we were we’d have already done what we’re thinking about doing. But right now we are as ready as we ever could be to be ourselves.

Think about it. No one knows you the way you do. If you don’t like something about yourself, change it or figure out why you are being so critical with yourself. If you need help doing that find that professional help.

The key point is to stop trying to be yourself and just start accepting that you can be yourself. You can do so without reservation, approval, permission or apology.

Isn’t it time for us to see who you are? Isn’t it time to move to that next level of expression? It’s inside you, perhaps desperately seeking the manifestation only you can provide. Let it out! Be YOU! WOO-HOO!

In Spirit, Truth and Playfulness,
Terry

#DrTerryMakingSense
#TheGlobalVision
#AWorldThatWorksForEveryone
#IAN1
@TerryDKaranen

Terry Drew Karanen © 2016

Focusing Our Attention

Have you ever wondered why positive thinking doesn’t always seem to work? Do you understand the difference between “positive thinking” and “thinking positively?”

First let me point out the first question includes “doesn’t seem to work,” not “doesn’t work.”  Positive thinking works exactly the same way as prayer, even the type of affirmative prayer developed by Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes. Our answers can only be reached at our level of acceptance.

Focusing our attention on one particular action has become increasingly difficult in our first world society. Multitasking – which I define as attempting to do a lot of stuff at the same time in a half-assed way leading to more frustration – has become the norm. It’s multitaskingtotally impossible to be focused on one thing and be thinking about another. Face a grizzly bear running toward you with snot and spit oozing out of its face and tell me you’re really concerned about painting the bedroom or how your lover forgot your birthday.

The basic universal law governing the demonstrations in our life that we desire is the Law of Cause and Effect. The answer to our prayer can only be realized if what we initiate in prayer is what we actually want. This leads us to the difference between positive thinking and thinking positively.

Both positive thinking and thinking positively are effective, though the latter will garner us far better results. The former is like changing the oil in your car; that latter like a major tune-up. Why?

Because positive thinking is light years away from the way we have been taught to think, which often ends up being “prepare for the worst and hope for the best.” Holmes taught us that hope is better than despair, but it pales in comparison to positively knowing the Truth in any situation.

We must completely and without exception laser-focus our attention on our desire or goal. If we don’t it’s the same thing as expecting the recitation of affirmations alone to create what we want without any further effort on our part.

Realizing our desires is an inside job. How many times have you heard someone say after a prayer, “Well, I hope that happens, but I don’t see how it can.” That’s exercising what I call the “Eeyore Consciousness,” the gloomy expectations of the little donkey from the Winnie the Pooh stories whose tail keeps falling off.

This is where thinking positively excels. The person who consistently thinks positively, meaning truly believing in the prayer or affirmation, and rejects any thought of that desire not being made manifest will find her or his answer.

Focusing our attention is mandatory for our hopes, dreams, goal and vision to become a reality. Is that easy? No. The majority of people don’t want to put in the effort, which explains why we don’t have more of what we want in our lives. Are you committed 100 percent to what you want? Are you willing to focus your attention on the attainment of that desired outcome? Do so and you’ll find your life unfolding in a manner you’ve never experienced up until now.

In Spirit, Truth and Playfulness,

Terry

#DrTerryMakingSense
#TheGlobalVision
#AWorldThatWorksForEveryone
#ScienceOfMind
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Mushrooms and Manure

Do you seem at times to be doing a lot, but accomplishing little? Working through a To Do list can end up being more of a chore than a triumph. If this has happened to you then perhaps it’s not the list but what’s on it.

People often wonder why their goals are not realized or their prayers not answered. A major part of seeing our desires manifest is the commitment we exhibit to produce the end result. It’s very easy to get bogged down in the details so that we are doing busy-work, rather than being busy about the work at hand.

Helpful in this regard is being able to understand the difference between what we need to do to accomplish our goals and what could be unnecessary drudgery. In his new book, “Elders Rock!” author Dr. Harvey W. Austin states this:

“Distinguish the mushroom from the horse manure it grows in.
They are both brown, but only one is edible.”

Well … THAT certainly puts it in a difference perspective, doesn’t it?mush1

We can ask ourselves if the world will end if our bed isn’t made daily. We might stop complaining about the commercials between the scenes of our favorite TV show and consider recording them to watch later in less time by skipping over the ads. Why, we might even consider what we want to do for the holidays instead of what society or our families say we should do.

My Grandma Esther used to say that being in horse manure up to your neck really isn’t so bad. After all, it’s warm and after a while you get used to the smell. I would challenge you to see if you’re putting up with the s%*t in your life that no longer serves you just because it’s easier than doing something about it.

Using a person in our life as the excuse not to return to school or take that trip may allow us to ignore the part that includes worrying about having the money needed. A physical ail may allow us to skip out on functions we didn’t have the nerve to say “No” to. The list goes on; I encourage you to find your own stories in this regard.

And, yes, they are stories. They are the horse manure we serve up to ourselves and others when we aren’t ready to make a decision. But the problem with that is it becomes all too easy, too warm, too comfortable, and so we stay stuck in the muck.

Perhaps this week you’ll consider the possibility of being more selective about the “mushrooms” you pick, noting more importantly what could be hanging on. If we are mindful and focused on our goals then we can allow the waste to fall off our plate just as easily as brushing the dirt and other matter off a little mushroom. Bon Appétit!

P.S.  Be sure to check out Harvey’s new book – just click here!

In Spirit, Truth and Playfulness,

Terry

#drterrymakingsense
#TheGlobalVision
#AWorldThatWorksForEveryone